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Enjoy Illinois

Starved Rock State Park  

Northwest Region Overlook of Illinois River
P.O. Box 509
Utica, IL 61373
815.667.4726
E-Mail

Site Brochure Fishing Picnicking
Boating Hiking Videos and Audio
Camping History Visitor Center
Directions Hunting Winter Sports
Events Lodge  
Frequently Asked Q's    


Update: All trails at Starved Rock east of the Visitor Center and Lodge are now open as of August 25th.

 

Experience the fun of outdoor adventure at Starved Rock State Park. Whether you enjoy hiking along the nature trails or viewing the many spectacular overlooks along the Illinois River, recreational opportunities abound. From picnicking to fishing to boating, from horseback riding to camping to enjoying winter sports, there’s so much to do that you’ll come back again and again.

The backdrop for your activities are 18 canyons formed by glacial meltwater and stream erosion. They slice dramatically through tree-covered, sandstone bluffs for four miles at Starved Rock State Park, which is located along the south side of the Illinois River, one mile south of Utica and midway between the cities of LaSalle-Peru and Ottawa.

The park is best known for its fascinating rock formations, primarily St. Peter sandstone, laid down in a huge shallow inland sea more than 425 million years ago and later brought to the surface.

While the areas along the river and its tributaries still are predominantly forested, much of the area is a flat, gently rolling plain. The upland prairies were created during an intensive warming period several thousand years after the melting of the glaciers. The Illinois River Valley in the Starved Rock area is a major contrast to the flatland. The valley was formed by a series of floods as glacial meltwater broke through moraines, sending torrents of water surging across the land and deeply eroding the sandstone and other sedimentary rocks.

During early spring, when the end of winter thaw is occurring and rains are frequent, sparkling waterfalls are found at the heads of all 18 canyons, and vertical walls of moss-covered stone create a setting of natural geologic beauty uncommon in Illinois. Some of the longer-lasting waterfalls are found in French, LaSalle and St. Louis canyons.

Waterfall in SummerWaterfalls, rivers and streams can undercut a cliff, creating overhangs in the sandstone, like Council Overhang at the east end of the park. Other sights can be seen from the bluffs themselves, which provide vantage points for enjoying spectacular vistas. The porous sandstone bluffs allow water to soak quickly through, only to collect in greater quantities on the slopes below. The resulting lush vegetation supports an abundant wildlife and bird population, including woodchucks, moles, vireos and catbirds. Wood ducks that nest in hollow trees occasionally can be seen paddling along the river’s edge. Evidence of beavers and muskrats can be seen as you walk along the River Trail.

Black oak, red cedar and white oak, as well as white pine and white cedar, grow on the drier, sandy bluff tops. Yellowbellied sapsuckers drill parallel rows of small holes on cedar trees and return to feed on sap and small insects. Serviceberry and northern honeysuckle--shrubs that prefer a well-drained area--attract scarlet tangers and cedar waxwings.

Farther away from the bluffs, red oaks and hickories predominate in deeper soils. Typical plants characteristic of the forest floor include the American witch hazel, black huckleberry and bracken fern. Nuthatches and chickadees feed on nuts, seeds and insects found in the bark of trees. Raccoons and flying squirrels spend many hours searching for and gathering berries and nuts.

At the forest edge, bright blue indigo buntings flit through the wild crab apple and plum trees that skirt the former glacial till prairie, while cottontail rabbits scamper through the bluestem and Indian grasses. In the sandy prairie soil, prickly pear cactus grows alongside lead plant, compass plant and rattlesnake master. White-tailed deer come to munch on the sumac, and red-tailed hawks soar overhead in search of voles and field mice.

Throughout spring and summer, wildflowers are as plentiful and varied as they are beautiful. Included in the floral array are colorful lichens and mosses, marsh marigolds, wild iris, trillium and Dutchman’s breeches, plus purple-flowered spiderworts, nodding or orange columbine and the magenta blooms of shooting star.

The poison ivy plant is found in all areas of the park. Its greenish-white berries provide an important food source for birds.

Special Events

Starved Rock State Park is host to a number of enjoyable annual events, including the Winter Wilderness Weekend and Eagle Watch Weekend in January, the Cross-Country Ski Weekend in February, the Annual Wildflower Pilgrimage in May, and the Fall Colors Weekend in October. Tree covered bluff on water

Visitor Center

Tthe visitor center offers displays and exhibits explaining the park’s cultural and natural history. A weekly schedule of activities is posted. Hours are 9 a.m - 4 p.m. daily (Closed Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day). Schools and other organized groups may arrange reservations for programs by contacting the center at (815) 667-4906 or writing to Program Coordinator, Starved Rock State Park, PO Box 509, Utica, IL 61373.

GUIDED HIKES, VISITOR CENTER HOURS, and SPECIAL EVENTS

 

Videos

View the below videos to learn more about Starved Rock and Mattheissen State Parks. There is also an "Audio Only" option if you would like to just listen.

Audio Only Format



Lodging

Situated on a high bluff just southwest of the rock itself is the stone and log lodge built in part by the Civilian Conservation Corps in the 1930s. The lodge has been refurbished, but still reflects the peaceful atmosphere of yesteryear. A new hotel wing has been added and features a registration lobby, an indoor swimming pool, whirlpool, saunas and an outdoor sunning patio.

The lodge offers 72 luxury hotel rooms and 22 comfortable cabin rooms. The Great Room is centered around a massive stone fireplace.

The restaurant is open seven days a week and offers many house specialties. It can accommodate up to 250 people for banquets. The lodge’s conference area can accommodate up to 200 with four smaller meeting rooms also available.

For lodge reservations, call 1-800-868-ROCK (7625) or (815) 667-4211, or visit the lodge website at Starved Rock Lodge and Conference Center or by mail: Starved Rock Lodge and Conference Center, PO Box 570, Utica, IL 61373.

History

This area has been home to humans from as early as 8000 B.C. Hopewellian, Woodland and Mississippian Native American cultures thrived here. The most recent and probably the most numerous group of Native Americans to live here was the Illiniwek, from the 1500s to the 1700s. Approximately 5,000 to 7,000 Kaskaskias, a subtribe of the Illiniwek, had a village extending along the bank of the Illinois River across from the current park.

In 1673, French explorers Louis Jolliet and Father Jacques Marquette passed through here on their way up the Illinois from the Mississippi. Known as “Pere,” the French word for “Father,” Marquette returned two years later to found the Mission of the Immaculate Conception-Illinois’ first Christian mission-at the Kaskaskia Indian village.

When the French claimed the region (and, indeed, the entire Mississippi Valley), they built Fort St. Louis atop Starved Rock in the winter of 1682-83 because of its commanding strategic position above the last rapids on the Illinois River. Pressured from small war parties of Iroquois in the French and Indian wars, the French abandoned the fort by the early 1700s and retreated to what is now Peoria, where they established Fort Pimitoui. Fort St. Louis became a haven for traders and trappers, but by 1720 all remains of the fort had disappeared.

Starved Rock State Park derives its name from a Native American legend of injustice and retribution. In the 1760s, Pontiac, chief of the Ottawa tribe upriver from here, was slain by an Illiniwek while attending a tribal council in southern Illinois. According to the legend, during one of the battles that subsequently occurred to avenge his killing, a band of Illiniwek, under attack by a band of Potawatomi (allies of the Ottawa), sought refuge atop a 125-foot sandstone butte. The Ottawa and Potawatomi surrounded the bluff and held their ground until the hapless Illiniwek died of starvation- giving rise to the name “Starved Rock.”

The Illinois State Parks Commission was initially headquartered in Starved Rock State Park after the park was purchased in 1911.

Hillside of fall colored treesHiking

Exploring the majestic bluffs and canyons is the park’s primary attraction, and there are 13 miles of well-marked trails to help you enjoy them.

The trails are open all year, but hikers are urged to exercise extreme caution and to stay on official trails. To keep you oriented, trail maps are located at all trail access points, intersections and points of interest. There are colored posts along the trails, corresponding to colors on the maps, and letter symbols on the trail brochure to further assist you. Finally, yellow dots on posts indicate that you are moving away from the lodge or visitor center, and white dots mean you are returning.

Due to the park’s fragile ecosystem, camping is prohibited in unauthorized areas and all rock climbing, rappelling or scrambling off trails is prohibited. Biking is not allowed on the hiking trails. For your own safety, you must be off the trails by dark. Alcohol is prohibited on all trails.

**Please note that there are no washrooms or drinking water areas on the trails.

Dam in Illinois RiverFishing and Boating

Boats may be launched from the west end of the park. Also, paddlewheel boat rides are available.

Boats are not allowed within 600 feet of the dam, as strong currents and powerful undertows can be dangerous.

Catfish, bullhead, white bass, sauger, walleye, carp and crappie may be caught in the Illinois River.

Under no circumstances should you attempt to wade or swim in the river, canyons or from any park shoreline.

Hunting

Hunter Fact Sheets:

 

Waterfall frozen in Winter

Winter ActivitiesCross-country skiing can be enjoyed at nearby Matthiessen State Park. Cross-country ski rentals are available at Matthiessen Dells Area on weekends December through March. Snowmobiling is not allowed anywhere at Starved Rock, but is allowed at the I & M Canal one mile to the north in Utica.

Eagle viewing is a popular winter activity enjoyed by many. Two places to see the eagles are the top of Starved Rock and the Illinois Waterway Visitor Center.

Picnicking

Developed picnic areas are available to the day visitor, with tables, drinking water and restroom facilities. Eight shelters are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Alcohol is prohibited January 1 through May 31 in the picnic area. Alcohol is always prohibited on the trails.

Camping | Campground Map

Starved Rock's campground has 129 Class-A Premium campsites.   All sites are available for reservation. Reservations are made on-line at reserveamerica.com

Reservations for regular campsites and youth group sites require a $5.00 non-refundable reservation fee and payment of the full camping and utility fees at the time the reservation is made. The camping fee for a regular campsite is $25.00 per night unless it is a holiday at which time the campsite fee is $35.00.

Payment of the entire camping and utility fee amount will guarantee that the reservation will be held for the entire length of the stay. Campsites can be reserved for a maximum of 14 nights per 30-day period

Reservations must be made at least three days before the campsite is needed. Reservations for Memorial Day, Fourth of July and Labor Day weekends require a three-night minimum stay reservation..

Reservations must be cancelled 3 days in advance to receive the entire camping fee. If cancelled after the 3 days, the first night’s camping fee will not be refunded. Remember the $5.00 reservation fee will NOT be refunded .

Each campsite has electricity and a grill pit for your campfire and grilling enjoyment. There is a shower and flush toilet building in each loop of the campground; and a separate youth group camping area.

Alcohol is ALWAYS prohibited in the campground. There is a camp store in the campground that operates seasonally (Usually May 1st to Oct. 31st) that sells firewood, ice, soda and other camping supplies.

During firearm deer seasons, the campground will be closed. The campground gates are opened from 8:30 am until 10:00 pm.


Surrounding Area

To find local attractions and restaurants, please visit the LaSalle County Visitors Bureau

 

Directions

I-39 southbound: South to I-80 east (exit #59). Go 2 miles to exit #81 (Rt. 178, Utica). Go south (right) 3 miles on Rt. 178 and follow the signs into the Park.

I-39 northbound: North to Exit #48 (Tonica exit). Go east (right) for approximately 5 miles to the T-intersection, which is Rt. 178. Go north (left) for approximately 5 miles and follow the signs into the Park.

I-80 Eastbound and Westbound: Get off at exit #81 (Rt.178, Utica). Go south 3 miles on Rt. 178 and follow the signs into the Park.

From the Chicago area: Take I-294 or I-355 south to I-55. Take I-55 south to I-80. Go west on I-80, 45 miles to Exit #81 (Rt. 178, Utica). Go south (left) 3 miles on Rt. 178 and follow the signs into the Park.

  • While groups of 25 or more are welcome and encouraged to use the park's facilities, they are required to register in advance with the site office to avoid crowding or scheduling conflicts.
  • At least one responsible adult must accompany each group of 15 minors.
  • Pets must be kept on leashes at all times.
  • Actions by nature can result in closed roads and other facilities. Please call ahead to the park office before you make your trip.
  • We hope you enjoy your stay. Remember, take only memories, leave only footprints.
  • For more information on tourism in Illinois, call the Illinois Department of Commerce and Community Affairs' Bureau of Tourism at 1-800-2Connect.
  • Telecommunication Device for Deaf and Hearing Impaired Natural Resources Information (217) 782-9175 for TDD only Relay Number 800-526-0844.

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