Wood Frog

 

Wood Frog

The wood frog has a dark robber’s mask. Although usually pink or tan, the body color is sometimes darker. This uncommon one-and-a-half to two-and-three-quarter-inch frog occurs sporadically in the forested areas of our state. The breeding season is very short and explosive, lasting only one or two weeks in March. The wood frog lays its eggs in the permanent or semi-permanent pools of moist woodlands but rarely lingers near water, even during the breeding season. The wood frog appears very early in the spring often before the ice is off the ponds. It is tolerant of cold and ranges further north than any other North American amphibian or reptile. The wood frog is difficult to see among the fallen leaves on the forest floor. It’s often only noticed by its long, low leaps. The breeding call resembles the feeding chuckle of a duck and has little carrying power.

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