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  Illinois Trees  


    Illinois   
T R E E S



black walnut Juglans nigra
one compound leaf
shingle oak Quercus imbricaria
three simple leaves
pecan Carya illinoinensis
one compound leaf


shagbark hickory Carya ovata
one compound leaf
bur oak Quercus macrocarpa
three simple leaves
northern red oak Quercus rubra
three simple leaves





mockernut hickory
Carya tomentosa

one compound leaf
swamp chestnut oak
Quercus michauxii

three simple leaves
black oak Quercus velutina
three simple leaves
pin oak Quercus palustris
three simple leaves
wild black cherry Prunus serotina
ten simple leaves
white oak Quercus alba
three simple leaves
swamp white oak
Quercus bicolor
three simple leaves
chinkapin or yellow chestnut oak
Quercus muhlenbergii
three simple leaves
hackberry Celtis occidentalis
three simple leaves

Forests are vital renewable and productive resources for Illinois. More than half of Illinois' native flora and
half of the threatened or endangered flora are found in Illinois' forests. More than 75 percent of the wildlife habitat in the state is in the forests. Forest-related industries employ nearly 65,000 people in Illinois and contribute over $4.5 billion annually to the state's economy through value added by manufacturing.

There are four distinctive forest types found in the state: bottomland forest; upland deciduous forest; coniferous forest; and southern Illinois lowland forest. Bottomland forests are large timbered areas bordering swamps or rivers. In Illinois, they cover about 809,000 acres. Upland deciduous forests have canopied trees that lose their leaves in the fall and are areas that are not subject to flooding. Of the state's 4.3 million forest acres, 3.6 million are deciduous forest. Coniferous forests contain cone-bearing evergreen trees. Illinois has about 72,000 acres of coniferous forest, most of it in the southern third of the state. Southern Illinois lowlands cover about 11,700 acres. This area is the northernmost extension of North America's Gulf Coastal Plain.

Species List Order Fagales  
Family Fagaceae  
        white oak Quercus alba
        swamp white oak Quercus bicolor
        shingle oak Quercus imbricaria
        bur oak Quercus macrocarpa
        swamp chestnut oak Quercus michauxii
        pin oak Quercus palustris
        chinkapin or yellow chestnut oak Quercus muhlenbergii
Kingdom Plantae         northern red oak Quercus rubra
   Division Magnoliophyta         black oak Quercus velutina
      Class Magnoliopsida    
  Order Juglandales  
  Family Juglandaceae  
           pecan Carya illinoinensis
           shagbark hickory Carya ovata
           mockernut hickory Carya tomentosa
           black walnut Juglans nigra
     
  Order Rosales  
Leaves and seeds are not shown in equal proportion to actual size. All images © IDNR. Chas J. Dees, Photographer. Family Rosaceae  
          wild black cherry Prunus serotina
   
Order Urticales  
Family Ulmaceae  
           hackberry Celtis occidentalis

This poster was made possible by:

Illinois Department of Natural Resources
     Division of Education
     Division of Habitat Resources
     Illinois State Museum

Illinois Department of Transportation

Design: Illinois State Museum

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