HISTORIC PRAIRIES OF ILLINOIS

Appendix 1


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Allen’s Prairie in Greene County, was twelve miles northeast of Carrolton. It was a large prairie with timber on the water courses.

Allison’s Prairie in Lawrence County, five miles northeast of Lawrenceville, was ten miles long and 5 miles wide. The eastern part near Wabash County contained some wet land and purgatory swamps, but most of it was dry.

Apple Creek Prairie in Greene County, north of Apple Creek, was ten miles long and two to four miles wide.

Arm of the Grand Prairie was in Jefferson County eight miles northeast of Mt. Vernon. The soil was tolerably good.

Barney’s Prairie in Wabash County, seven miles north of Mt. Carmel, was a good tract of land.

Bear Prairie in Wayne County was a small tract of land five miles east of Fairfield.

Bellview Prairie in Calhoun County was a rich, dry prairie at the foot of the bluffs in the Illinois River bottom that was six miles long and nearly a mile wide.

Big Mound Prairie in Wayne County, five miles west of Fairfield, was three miles in extent with thin soil and an undulating surface. A large mound gave this prairie its name.

Big Prairie in White County, between the Little and Big Wabash Rivers, was three miles in diameter with a sandy soil.

Big Prairie was in Monroe County.

Big Prairie in St. Clair County in American Bottoms was settled before 1800. Two men burned to death in a prairie fire at this site.

Birk’s Prairie in Edwards County, about 4,000 acres in size, was long and narrow with several salt licks. The ground was worn away near these sites.

Boltinghouse Prairie in Edwards County, south of Albion, was four miles long and three miles wide with a dry undulating surface. Mr. Boltinghouse was killed in a skirmish with Native Americans.

Bon Pas Prairie in Edwards County, four miles northeast of Albion, was about two miles in diameter.

Bonus Prairie in Boone County was settled in 1836.

Brown’s Prairie in the corner of Macoupin and Green Counties was twelve miles north of Alton between Wood River and the Piasa. It had a rich, dry soil.

Brushy Prairie in Wayne County was eleven miles east of Fairfield on the east side of the Little Wabash River.

Buckeye Prairie in Christian County was settled by people from the Buckeye State of Ohio.

Buckheart Prairie in Fulton County, northeast of Lewistown, was six to eight miles in extent and joined with Canton Prairie.

Buck Prairie in Edwards County, six miles northeast of Albion, was two and one-half miles wide.

Bullard’s Prairie, sometimes called Gardner’s Prairie, was sixteen miles west of Lawrenceville in Lawrence County, and was eight to ten miles long and two miles wide with second rate soil.

Bull’s Eye Prairie in Mason County was an extensive wet prairie in the Sangamon River bottom.

Burnt Prairie in the northwest part of White county was two miles in diameter.

Burnt Prairie in Edwards County, four miles northwest of Albion, was six miles long and two miles wide and interspersed with small groves. Mr. Clark erected a wind driven mill to grind grain at this site.

Canton Prairie in Fulton County began near the Spoon River and ran north and formed the dividing line for the waters that flowed into the Spoon River on the west and the Illinois River to the east. At Canton it was two to three miles wide, rich, and undulating.

Casey’s Prairie in Jefferson County, near Mt. Vernon, was five miles long and two miles wide with a tolerably level surface and second rate soil.

Christy’s Prairie in Lawrence County, ten miles west of Lawrenceville, had rolling topography and average soil.

Clay Prairie in Clark County was west of Union Prairie and eight miles southwest of Darwin.

Cold Prairie in St. Clair County, in the American Bottoms, was on the road from St. Louis to Belleville.

Conant Prairie in Perry County, west of Pinkneyville, was less than seven miles long.

Cotton Hill Prairie in Sangamon County was between South Fork and Horse Creek, twelve miles south of Springfield.

Cox’s Prairie in Jackson County, northeast of Brownsville, had a rolling surface.

Crow’s Prairie in Putnam county was so named due to the abundance of crows at this site.

Decker’s Prairie in Wabash County, twelve miles northeast of Mr. Carmel, was small with an undulating, second rate surface.

Diamond Grove Prairie in Morgan County, south of Jacksonville, was four miles long with rich soil and a dry, undulating surface.

Dolson’s Prairie in the west side of Clark County was six miles wide and twice as long. It was considerably wet with a thin, clay soil.

Drennan’s Prairie in Sangamon County was located near Panther Creek between Auburn and Chatham.

Dutch Prairie was in the southeast part of St. Clair County.

Eaton Prairie in Perry County was about three miles west of Pinckneyville.

Edmonson’s Prairie in McDonough County, six miles southwest of Macomb, was one to two miles wide and ten miles long.

Eight Mile Prairie in Franklin County, eighteen miles southwest of Frankfort, was level and one to two miles in diameter.

Elk Prairie in Perry County, between the Little Muddy and Beaucoup Creeks, was five miles long with a dry, level surface and second rate soil.

English Prairie in Edwards County was initially called Boltinghouse Prairie. This site was used extensively for hay.

Estes Prairie in Franklin County, fourteen miles north of Frankfort, had a level, dry surface.

Flat Prairie in Randolph County was 20 miles east of Kaskaskia.

Fork Prairie in Bond County, between the forks of Shoal Creek north of Greenville, had a gently undulating surface.

Forked Prairie was in Sangamon County east of the South Fork.

Four Mile Prairie in Petty County, adjacent to Pinckneyville, was seven miles long and four miles wide with an elevated, dry, undulating surface.

Fourteen Mile Prairie in Effingham county received its name from the distance along the National Road. It had a level surface and some dry land.

Fox Prairie was in Richland County.

French Creek Prairie in Edwards County, southeast of Albion, was between the Little Wabash River and Bonpas Creek.

Froggy Prairie was located in Honey Creek Township in Adams County. It was a wet prairie named due to the abundance of frogs.

Garden Prairie in Sangamon County, between Richland and Rock Creeks, fourteen miles northwest of Springfield, was two miles wide and eight miles long with a level, rich surface. It was beautiful when the prairie was in bloom.

German Prairie was northeast of Springfield in Sangamon County.

Goose Nest Prairie was in Coles County, and was the site where the family of Abraham Lincoln settled after moving to Illinois form Indiana.

Grand Prairie in the east and central counties was between the Mississippi and the Wabash Rivers.

Grand Prairie in Crawford County, between the Embarrass and Wabash Rivers, ran north into Clark and Edgar Counties. It was narrow and wet.

Grand Prairie in Clinton County, east of the Okaw River, had a hard pan under the prairie.

Grand Coti Prairie in Washington County was on a ridge between the Kaskaskia river and Beaucoup Creek.

Granger’s Prairie in the northwest part of the Adams County was three miles long and over a mile wide with very rich soil.

Gun Prairie in Jefferson county, south of Mr. Vernon. was two miles long and a mile wide.

Hancock Prairie in Adams County was a nearly level prairie that began above Bear Creek and continued north for about fifteen miles into Warren County.

Hargrave’s Prairie in Wayne County, near Fairfield, was seven miles long and two miles wide with thin soil.

Hart’s Prairie was a small prairie in Morgan County, south of Waverly, that was named after Rev. William A. Hart.

Hawkin’s Prairie in Greene County was on the south side of Macoupin Creek about nine miles south of Carrolton.

Herrignton’s Prairie, eleven miles northwest of Fairfield, in Wayne County, was eight miles long and two to four miles wide with a rolling surface and second rate soil.

Herron’s Prairie was in the southwestern part of Franklin County.

High Prairie in St. Clair County was a beautiful prairie eight miles south of Belleville.

Hogg Prairie in Hamilton County, a few miles west of McLeansboro, was two miles in diameter and level and wet. It was named after Samuel Hogg.

Horse Prairie in Randolph County had a rich, undulating surface. It received its name from the presence of wild horses.

Illinois Prairie in Calhoun County, formerly called Wolf Prairie, began at the mouth of the Illinois River and continued north for twenty miles along the bottoms. It was over a mile wide.

Indian Prairie in Wayne County, ten miles northwest of Fairfield, had soil of an indifferent quality.

Jersey Prairie in Morgan County was Beautiful prairie ten miles north of Jacksonville.

Jordan’s Prairie in Jefferson County, six miles north of Mr. Vernon, was five miles long and over a mile wide with a second rate soil.

Knight’s Prairie was west of McLeansboro in Hamilton County.

Knob Prairie in Franklin County was a low, wet prairie fifteen miles northwest of Frankfort.

Lamotte Prairie in Crawford County was a sandy, rich site that was eight miles long and one to five miles wide.

LaSalle Prairie in Peoria county, adjoining Lake Peoria, was a sandy, rich site above the highest floods that was ten miles long and three to four miles wide.

Lemarde Prairie in Wayne County, seven miles northwest of Fairfield, was six miles long and three miles wide and of inferior quality.

Lick Prairie was in the southern part of Wabash County.

Little Prairie in Washington County was in the midst of an elevated post oak flat.

Little Mount Prairie in Wayne County, three miles southwest of Fairfield, was two miles long and a mile wide. A small high mound in this prairie contained the graves of Native Americans.

Long Prairie in Wabash County, thirteen miles northwest of Mr. Carmel, had an undulating, second rate surface.

Long Prairie in Edwards County, north of Albion, was nine miles long, over a mile wide, and interspersed with groves of timber.

Long Prairie was in Boone County.

Long Prairie in Clay County, a branch of Twelve Mile Prairie, was eight to ten miles long and thirteen miles wide with level, poor soil.

Long Prairie in Jefferson County, five miles west of Mt. Vernon, was four miles long and over a mile wide.

Looking Glass Prairie in St. Clair County was a large, rich, undulating, beautiful prairie between Silver and Sugar Creeks that extended north into Madison County for twenty miles.

Lorton’s Prairie in Green County, on the north side of Apple Creek, had excellent land and good timber.

Lost Prairie in Perry County, seven miles west of Pinckneyville, was three miles long and over a mile wide with rich soil and a high, undulating surface.

Loup Prairie was in St. Clair County.

Luken’s Prairie was in the south side of Lawrence County.

Macon County Prairie north of Decatur in Macon county, between the north fork of the Sangamon River and Salt Creek, was level and wet in some areas and dry and undulating elsewhere.

Macoupin Prairie in Greene County, between the Piasa and Macoupin Creeks, had a moderately undulating, rich surface.

Marshall’s Prairie north of Cox’s Prairie, fourteen miles northeast of Brownsville, in Jackson County had a rich, undulating surface.

Mason’s Prairie in the southwest part of Lawrence County was twenty miles from Lawrenceville.

McCall’s Prairie was in Robinson township in Crawford County.

Mill’s Prairie in Edwards County, eleven miles northeast of Albion, was four miles long and over two miles wide.

Moore’s Prairie in Jefferson County, six to twelve miles southeast of Mt. Vernon, was eight miles long and two to three miles wide.

Moore’s Prairie in St. Clair County, five miles east of Belleville, was five miles long with tolerably good soil.

Mud Prairie in Morgan County was approximately six miles southwest of Waverly.

Mud Prairie was located in the southeast part of St. Clair County.

Mud Prairie, located on Mud Creek in Washington and Perry Counties, fourteen miles northeast of Pinckneyville, was level and rather wet.

Mud Prairie, in Wayne County, eight miles northwest of Fairfield, was low and wet.

Nine Mile Prairie in Perry County, ten miles northwest of Fairfield, was low and wet.

North Arm Prairie in Edgar County, six miles east of Paris, ran east to the Indiana line and west to join with the Grand Prairie. It was three miles wide and consisted of good land.

North Prairie in Morgan County, twelve miles northeast of Jacksonville, on the south side of Mauveterre Creek had a rich, dry, undulating surface.

Oblong Prairie in Edwards County was one mile wide and had very fertile soil.

Oblong Prairie in Crawford County occupied ten sections and was so named because of its peculiar shape. The name was later applied to the town.

Ogle’s Prairie in St. Clair County, five miles north of Belleville, was a beautiful, undulating prairie five miles long and one to two miles wide.

Old Pearl Prairie in Pike County was located north of the present village of Pearl.

Ox Bow Prairie in Putnam County, ten miles south of Hennepin, was rich prairie five miles long and one to two miles wide, shaped like an oxbow and surrounded by timber.

Parker’s Prairie in Clark County was a large, level prairie with wet, second rate soil.

Phelp’s Prairie in Franklin County on the waters of Crab Orchard Creek, Twelve miles south of Frankfort, was good, somewhat rolling land.

Philo Prairie in Williamson County, twelve miles south of Frankfort, had a gently undulating, fertile surface.

Plum Creek Prairie in St. Clair County and part of Randolph County was three miles wide and ten miles long with good soil.

Poor Prairiein Franklin County, twelve miles south of Frankfort, was level, wet land.

Prairie du Long was in the south part of St. Clair County.

Pratt’s Prairie was in the northeastern part of Green County, fifteen miles northwest of Carrolton.

Rattan’s Prairie in Madison County, seven miles northwest of Edwardsville, was level and wet in places.

Ridge Prairie in Madison County started near Edwardsville and extended south into St. Clair County. It was the dividing ridge for the waters that fall into the Mississippi on the west and the Kaskaskia River on the east.

Rollin’s Prairie in Franklin County, north of Frankfort, was six miles long and four miles wide with level good soil.

Round Prairie in the northeast part of Schuyler County on Williams Creek, twenty miles from Rushville, had a rich, dry, undulating surface that was surrounded by timber.

Round Prairie was in LeRoy Township in Boone County.

Round Prairie in Wabash County, twelve miles northeast of Mt. Carmel, was four miles in diameter and had fertile surface.

Round Prairie in Bond County, six miles west of Greenville, was one to two miles in diameter with a rich, undulating surface.

Round Prairie Perry County on the east side of Beaucoup Creek, eight miles from Pinckneyville, was seven miles long and one to two miles wide.

Round Prairie was in Sangamon County in the forks of Sugar Creek and the south fork of the Sangamon River, seven miles southeast of Springfield.

Round Prairie in Marshall County was six miles wide.

Salt Prairie in Calhoun County, between the bluffs and Salt Prairie Slough, was six miles long and less than a mile wide. A large saline spring was at the head of the prairie.

Sand Prairie in Tazewell County was four miles south of Pekin and had rich, sandy soil.

Santa Fe Prairie in Clinton County was a wet prairie of coarse grass on a principal bend of the Kaskaskia River.

Saratoga Prairie was in Saratoga Township in Marshall County.

Seven Mile Prairie in White County was seven miles west of Carmi.

Shipley’s Prairie was a small prairie in Wayne County, five miles south of Fairfield.

Shoal Creek Prairie was an extensive prairie west of Shoal Creek in Clinton, Bond, and Montgomery Counties. it was slightly rolling with an average width of eight miles.

Six Mile Prairie, in the American bottoms, in the southwestern part of Madison County was surrounded by a heavy body of timber.

Six Mile Prairie in Perry County, nine miles southwest of Pinckneyville, was nine miles long and six miles wide with good, level soil.

Six’s Prairie in Schuyler County, seventeen miles south of Rushville, was a rich, undulating prairie ten miles long and three miles wide surrounded by timber. Mt. Sterling was located in this prairie.

Smith’s Prairie was in Fulton County near Lewiston. It was a most beautiful prairie.

Smooth Prairie in Madison County, in the forks of Wood River eight miles east of Alton, was three miles long and two miles wide, level, and wet.

South Prairie in Morgan County was on the south side of Walnut Creek.

Squaw Prairie in Boone County was ten sections in size, level, and fertile.

String Prairie in Greene County between Macoupin and Apple Creeks, four miles west of Carrolton, was fifteen miles long and less than one to three miles wide, rich, and level.

Strawn’s Prairie in Putnam County, north of Magnolia, was named after Jeremiah Strawn.

Stum’s Prairie was in Edwards County south of Albion.

Sugar Prairie was in Richland County.

Sweet’s Prairie was a level, wet prairie in the south part of Morgan County, three miles west of Manchester.

Swett’s Prairie in Madison County was four miles northeast of Edwardsville.

Three Mile Prairie in Washington County, eight miles south of Nashville, had an undulating surface.

Tom’s Prairie in Wayne County was six miles northeast of Fairfield on the Elm River.

Totten’s Prairie in Fulton County, seven miles west of Lewiston, was ten miles long and three miles wide.

Turney’s Prairie in Wayne County was a small prairie with good soil, eight miles south of Fairfield.

Twelve Mile Prairie in Effingham County, west of the Little Wabash River, was level and wet in places. The National Road crossed it in Effingham County.

Twelve Mile Prairie in St. Clair County was an undulating prairie with good soil. The Native American name for this site was Tay-mar-waus.

Union Prairie in southeastern Clark County was five miles long and three miles wide.

Union Prairie in Schuyler County was four miles west of Rushville.

Village Prairie in Edwards County was two miles north of Albion. A small stream called the Village ran through it to the Little Wabash.

Walnut Hill Prairie in Marion and Jefferson Counties was four miles long, three miles wide, flat and wet.

Walnut Prairie in Clark County, near the Wabash River, was five miles long and two miles wide with level, rich, sand soil. The prairie received its name from the numerous walnut trees around the periphery of the prairie.

Webb’s Prairie in Franklin County, fifteen miles east of Frankfort, was good land.

Willow Prairie in Crawford County in Oblong Township occupied ten sections.

Wood’s Prairie in Wabash County, ten miles from Mt. Carmel, was good prairie.

Wright’s Prairie in Franklin County, twelve miles south of Frankfort, had an undulating surface.


Revis Prairie| Sand Prairie| Matanzas Prairie| Part I: Prairie Establishment| Part II: Prairie Plants In Landscape Design| Literature Cited| Back to Table of Contents